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Air Force Looks at the Benefits of Using CPCs
on F-16 Black Boxes

A three-ship formation of F-16C Fighting Falcons
A three-ship formation of F-16C Fighting Falcons carries AIM-120 and AIM-9 air-to-air missiles near the southern Florida coastline. The F-16s belong to the 482nd Fighter Wing/93rd Fighter Squadron at Homestead Air Reserve Base. Photo by M.Sgt. Joe Cupido, U.S. Air Force.

During a U.S. air strike northeast of Baghdad on June 7, 2006, two Air Force F-16s killed Abu Musab Al-Zarqawi, the Jordanian Al Qaeda leader based in Iraq. They destroyed the terrorist's safe house using two 500-pound bombs.

With its single engine and versatile tactical capability, the F-16 Fighting Falcon was built to serve critical U.S. missions such as this one. Since the early 1980s, F-16s owned by the United States, NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization), Israel, Pakistan, and the Netherlands have participated in numerous military conflicts worldwide, especially in the Middle East.

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New Inspection Technology for Warships Enhances Safety and Lowers Costs

The U.S. Navy's amphibious warships are specially designed to support assault operations from the sea against defended positions ashore. These combined-arm, crisis-response vessels are the primary landing ships for Marine expeditionary units. Flexible and adaptive, they are used to embark, transport, and land Marines and equipment during warfare and other missions.

The USS Whidbey Island
The USS  Whidbey Island, headed to the Arabian Gulf in September 2006, is one of three amphibious ships installed with a new wireless corrosion monitoring system for ballast tanks. Photo by Mass Communications Specialist Christopher L. Clark, U.S. Navy.

The USS Whidbey Island, an amphibious dock landing ship commissioned in 1985, is one such ship. In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the Navy deployed it to bring badly needed military personnel and supplies to the devastated Gulf Coast.

To transport people and equipment from these warships, the Navy uses air-cushion and landing craft or amphibious vehicles, as well as helicopters and aircraft distinguished for their vertical takeoff and landing capabilities.

These assault vessels feature a flight deck and a well deck that can be ballasted and de-ballasted to support landing craft or adjust for other load shifts as needed.

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DoD Meets with Australia's Defense Science Technology Organization


Table of Contents


Volume 3, Number 1
Spring 2007

Top Stories

Air Force Looks at the Benefits of Using CPCs on F-16 Black Boxes

New Inspection Technology for Warships Enhances Safety and Lowers Costs

University of Akron and Partners Lay Groundwork for New Degree Programs

DoD Meets with Australia's Defense Science Technology Organization

Featured Projects

New Inspection Technology for Warships Enhances Safety and Lowers Costs

Navy's New Aluminum Anodizing Process is Safe and Effective

Inside DoD

Portrait of Robert Herron: DoD Corrosion Team Leader

DoD Invites Experts to Attend Next Corrosion Forum at NACE CORROSION/2007

DoD Funds Texas Nanotechnology Consortium

Tri-Service Conference Planners Issue Call for Papers

What's New on the DoD Corrosion Exchange

Upcoming Conferences

CorrDefense Policies

Policy on Use of Trade Names

Policy on Reprinting Material from CorrDefense

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